May 17, 2020

Mondelēz International Opens $90 Million ‘factory of the future’ in Bahrain

Mondelez International
bicuit
oreo
snack
Laura Mullan
2 min
The new 250,000 square meter manufacturing facility is the size of 30 soccer fields with a production capacity of nearly 45,000 tons per year.
Mondelēz International, the snack company behind brands such as Oreos and Ritz, has opened a new $90mn factory in Bahrain.

The new 250,000 square mete...

Mondelēz International, the snack company behind brands such as Oreos and Ritz, has opened a new $90mn factory in Bahrain.

The new 250,000 square meter manufacturing facility is the size of 30 soccer fields with a production capacity of nearly 45,000 tons per year.

The US-based company has already invested over $75mn in a Kraft cheese and Tang-powdered beverage plant in Bahrain.

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Demand for Mondelēz's biscuits in the Middle East and Africa has been growing at double-digit rates, according to the company.

The new state-of-the-art facility aims to capitalise on this growing demand by serving as a hub for exports to the region, helping Mondelēz cut down on delivery costs and improve the freshness of its items.

Mondelēz says that the two plants will help to create 150 direct jobs and help sustain over 12,000 indirect jobs.

“This investment in Bahrain is a great example of how we’re building a world-class supply chain, with Factories of the Future in strategic locations around the world designed to simplify operations, increase flexibility, improve productivity and meet the growth demands of our Power Brands,” said Daniel Myers, Executive Vice President of Integrated Supply Chain.

He added: “This investment in Bahrain is a great example of how we’re building a world-class supply chain, with Factories of the Future in strategic locations around the world designed to simplify operations, increase flexibility, improve productivity and meet the growth demands of our Power Brand.”

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Jul 26, 2021

Ireland could create template for global food sustainability

Food
Ireland
sustainability
CarbonEmissions
John Pinching
2 min
Luck of the Irish
Irish are dancing to an ethical food production tune as the world watches

Leveraging innovation could cultivate new agricultural breakthroughs, making Ireland the most responsible and sustainable food producer on Earth, according to a renowned local luminary.

Economist and author David McWilliams has insisted that Ireland can become a pivotal carbon-neutral, resource-efficient and sustainable food producer – possibly the most influential on the planet. 

He does acknowledge, however, that there are considerable obstacles on the country’s trailblazing journey to complete energy-efficient and sustainable food production.

McWilliams also claims that the widely-held belief within the EU that reducing food production thus reduces carbon emissions does not tally.

“For the European Union to get an aggregate reduction in carbon emissions,” said McWilliams at the Alltech ONE Ideas Conference. “It would seem to me much more logical to favour those countries that have had an evolutionary, ecological or environmental gift, in order to actually produce more, not less, because your input-output ratio is so much lower than it is either in the parched Mediterranean or in the frozen tundra of the North.”

Reflecting on the situation in the US, McWilliams said its agriculture output had tripled between 1948 and 2015, with exponential gains in efficiency. Surprisingly, agriculture only contributes to 7.5% of total US greenhouse gases, far below the 30% attributed to cars.

“I think American culture is changing, at least when you see it from the outside,” said McWilliams said of President Biden’s approach. “He's saying, ‘There's no point being wealthy if the wealth is only in the hands of a small minority. The wealth has to trickle down to everybody else.’”
 
McWilliams concluded that for Irish agriculture to modernise and grow, it should use one of Ireland’s leading sectors – technology – as a frame of reference.  It currently generates over $25 billion in exports.
 

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