May 17, 2020

Mondelez International invests $50 million in Nigeria production facility

Mondelez International
Food Manufacturing
Africa food manufacturing
Nigeria
Frazer Jones
2 min
Daniel Myers, Mondelez International Executive Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain, celebrates the opening of the new Cadbury Bounvita plant in Lagos, Nigeria, with local leaders and government of
Mondelez International is not just growing its business in the United States—the snack company is growing worldwide, and that requires investments...

Mondelez International is not just growing its business in the United States—the snack company is growing worldwide, and that requires investments wherever the potential for further growth arises. This month Mondelez announced that it is pursuing strategic growth in its Africa market, investing $50 million into a new state-of-the-art production facility in Nigeria.

RELATED CONTENT: What Mondelez CEO Irene Rosenfeld can teach us about employee transparency

This investment is predicated on the popularity of Cadbury Bournvita, a cocoa beverage manufactured by Mondelez subsidiary Cadbury. While Bournvita is no longer produced in Cadbury’s native UK, it has gained substantial popularity around the world, particularly in Nigeria where Mondelez has identified it as a leading regional Power Brand. By enhancing its production power in Nigeria, Mondelez will be able to improve supply chain efficiency and deliver a better and more reliable product to its consumer base.

RELATED CONTENT: Mondelez is investing $130 million in modernizing its North America supply chain

The new plant is located in Lagos, and replaces a previous plant with all-new technology. According to a statement from Mondelez, the new plant is fully automated and will have a much higher capacity for expansion, allowing the company to respond to further growth opportunities in the region.

RELATED CONTENT: Mondelez International to Build $90 Million Manufacturing Plant in Bahrain

"Our new Lagos plant is the latest example of our global effort to build a world-class supply chain," said Daniel Myers, Mondelez International's Executive Vice President of Integrated Supply Chain, in the company’s press release. "This investment in Nigeria boosts our production capacity for Cadbury Bournvita by more than 30 percent for 180 million Nigerian consumers. It also complements our recent investments in Egypt and South Africa where we've increased chocolate production capacity and created one of our region's biggest supply hubs for gum, moving our chocolate and gum power brands to advantaged assets."

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Jun 21, 2021

Tech firm BestBees helps honey bees with remote monitoring

Food
honey
bees
BestBees
Helen Adams
3 min
Honey bees are struggling. Tech firm like Best Bees and ApisProtect are using remote monitoring to help them rise again

The global honey industry was worth an estimated $9.2b in 2020. Out of the 100 crop species which feed 90% of the world's population, 70 of them are pollinated by bees. In addition, 1.4b farming jobs, depend on the pollination of crops carried out by bees. 

Bees are vitally important to planet earth and everyone on it - but they are in danger. Between April 2019 and 2020, 43% of US hives were lost. Bee hives have been devastated by:

  • Parasites
  • Pesticides
  • Climate change

Tech firms have taken on one of the world’s oldest occupations, beekeeping, in order to maintain the welfare of the the mighty bumblebee. 

 

Best Bees Company bumbles forward

US business, Best Bees Company, was shocked at the plight of the American bee colonies.

Best Bees install hives and then use an advanced software system to monitor and record the health of each bee hive.

"We are looking at why thriving beehives live", said Wilson-Rich, chief scientific officer at Best Bees. "We need to understand why they're doing better. With that research data we can get wonderful benefits... it is telling us how the bees are actually doing."

Best Bees also harvests and bottles the honey for the property owners, of where the hives sit, to enjoy.

The data is being shared with Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where researchers are trying to understand and assist the bees in their duty.

 

Tech saves beekeepers time and labour 

The Irish business ApisProtect is also utilising technology to help the bees, through their wireless in-hive sensors, which transmit data.

"We collect temperature, humidity, sound and acceleration [of the bees flying out of the hive] data," said  Fiona Edwards Murphy, chief executive "What we do is extract those raw data points and then use machine learning to convert that into useful information. We tell the beekeeper, for example, which hives are growing and which hives are shrinking, or which hives are alive and which hives are dead."

The technology means beekeepers no longer have to manually inspect hives, which saves time and effort and allows the bees to go about their business uninterrupted. 

"In a commercial operation only about 20% of hives at any given time need intervention," concludes Edwards Murphy. "The problem is that beekeepers don't know which 20%. They literally go out and pick around a hive to see if it's the one they should be looking at. What we do is enable them to get a picture of what's happening in all their hives, spread across a large area, before they even leave their office in the morning. For commercial beekeepers, we see a 50% reduction in labour costs. That obviously has a huge impact on the business of beekeeping."

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