Jun 13, 2021

Tyson Foods 2050 net-zero target with no bargain on taste

TysonFoods
Food
protein
Agriculture
Helen Adams
3 min
The global protein company, Tyson Foods, has recognised its responsibility to the environment and aims to reduce emissions

Tyson Foods, a leading global protein company, aims to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions across its global operations and supply chain by 2050. 

The company supplies 20% of the USA’s beef, pork and chicken and is best known for products such as Jimmy Dean, Hillshire Farm and BallPark.

As the first U.S.-based protein company to have an emissions reduction target approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi), this ambition, in conjunction with the release of the company’s fiscal year 2020 Sustainability Progress Report, underscores the company’s commitment to help combat the urgency of the growing climate change crisis. 

 

Food giant Tyson will meet net-zero targets

The high level of meat and diary that humans consume is fuelling climate change for many reasons:

  • Gassy cows, sheep and goats are responsible for up to 14% of all greenhouse emissions.
  • 75% of agricultural land across the world is used for animal agriculture. This includes land for the animals to graze upon, as well as the land used for the crops which animals eat to grow in. The amount of land required leads to deforestation.

The move to net-zero is an expansion of Tyson Foods current science-based target of achieving a 30% GHG emissions reduction by 2030, which is aligned with limiting global temperature rise to 2.0c. 

As a global organisation with 239 facilities and 139,000 employees worldwide, achieving net-zero emissions is a large task, which will require a collective effort from every team member, in addition to external stakeholders.

Tyson Foods’ goals include:

  • For emissions to align with limiting global temperature rise to 1.5℃, consistent with the Paris Agreement, by the end of 2023.
  • Expanding the company’s current 5m acre grazing lands target for sustainable beef production practices by 2025.
  • Continuing work to eliminate deforestation risk throughout its global supply chain by 2030.

 

Tyson foods supports accountability and transparency

“We believe what good food can do for people and the planet is powerful. Our net-zero ambition is another important step in our work toward realising our aspiration to become the most transparent and sustainable food company in the world,” said Donnie King, Tyson Foods President and CEO. 

“At Tyson Foods, we believe progress requires accountability and transparency and we are proud to exemplify that as we work to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050,” said John R. Tyson, Chief Sustainability Officer, Tyson Foods. “As the first U.S.-based protein company in the food and beverage sector to have an emissions reduction target approved by the Science Based Targets initiative, we hope to continue to push the industry as a leader and remain committed to making a positive impact on our planet, with our team members, consumers and customers, and in the communities we serve.”

Tyson Foods’ new ambition, along with the company’s existing sustainability goals, is aligned with the UN Sustainable Development Goals, which include:

Goal 2: ‘End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture’. 

Goal 15: ‘Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.’

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Jul 21, 2021

Time waits for no man or woman as The Hundred begins

Food
cricket
thehundred
Sustainability
2 min
100 balls, no excuses!
Cricket most inclusive tournament encourages sustainability, picnics and goodwill

What WG Grace would have thought of The Hundred – the latest attempt to bring cricket to a wider international audience – is probably not repeatable. In time, perhaps, he will understand that this new jamboree is designed as a ‘gateway drug’ to encourage people to take up cricket themselves.

Lord’s, the wistful, melancholic ground in North West London – designed in 1814 – is the spiritual home of cricket and, along with seven other grounds, will host this curious new incarnation of a historically long-form game. Indeed, seven teams across eight cities will be allocated only 100 balls each per fixture. 

And with ‘cool’, millennial-friendly names like London Spirit, Manchester Originals and Welsh Fire they will be expected to smash as many boundaries and sixes as possible in the shortened format, leaving fans delirious, engaged and able to navigate the eccentricities of this hopelessly romantic pastime.

Perhaps most importantly, the tournament will be the stage for a brilliant array of women cricketers including Australia’s Jess Jonassen, England’s Sarah Taylor, South Africa’s Mignon du Preez and Stafanie Taylor from the West Indies. 

By making each fixture two and a half-hours, The Hundred is already decreasing waste and carbon emissions. At Lord’s – as with many other grounds – only cashless payment methods are accepted, reducing the spread of COVID-19 during an event where the food and drink is as much part of the sport as the pyrotechnics of bat and ball (indeed, some would regard it as far more important). 

With this considered, spectators at Lord’s are encouraged to consume extravagant picnics in several opulent locations, including the Coronation Garden. Meanwhile, those attending the matches at Lord’s have been permitted to bring one bottle of wine or Champagne (wonderful evidence that breaking with tradition has its limits). Sustainability awareness also extends to cans of beer or cider (two per person) and, my personal favourite, two cans of premixed aperitifs.

Also, 25 water fountains throughout Lord’s will enable fans to refill their own bottles, while The Lord’s Tavern will be serving responsibly-sourced food throughout the day.

At several of the grounds, including Lord’s, there will also be a drive to reduce plastic waste. Cider and beer sold on site will be provided in reusable cups, but during The Hundred there will be no £1 charge.

Now that really is cricket!
 

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