Jun 6, 2021

Tyson Foods Announces Donnie King as new President and CEO

Food
TysonFoods
PeopleMove
DonnieKing
Helen Adams
2 min
Protein leaders Tyson Foods have announced Donnie King to succeed Dean Banks as President and CEO in new people move

Tyson Foods has announced that Chief Operating Officer Donnie King has been named President and Chief Executive Officer. Current President and CEO Dean Banks is leaving Tyson Foods, for personal reasons. 

The company is headquartered in Arkansas, USA, has a revenue of $42b and is best known for animal meat products such as Hillshire Farm, Raised and Rooted and Wunderbar. 

 

Tyson Foods new CEO is ready for “the protein business”

King has more than 36 years of experience in the protein business, holding a variety of executive leadership positions involving virtually all facets of the company including poultry, beef, pork, prepared foods and international. 

He has also provided executive oversight of other important areas, such as food safety and quality assurance, health and safety, continuous improvement, engineering, and supply chain. 

“The board and I know that Donnie has a deep understanding of our business, values and culture and the solid leadership skills needed to continue to implement our strategy and deliver strong results,” said John H. Tyson, chairman of the board. “We want to express our appreciation to Dean for his contributions as a board member and executive.” 

 

Former Tyson Foods CEO “concentrating on family is the right decision”

“Being a part of Tyson Foods has been a very rewarding experience,” said Banks. “Upon deep personal reflection, and discussions with my family, the board, and my colleagues, I believe that stepping down and concentrating on my family is the right decision at this time.” 

“I’m humbled but excited about leading Tyson Foods, a company that feeds millions of people and means so much to me personally,” said King. “I believe we need to be sharply focused on operating with excellence, executing our strategies, and continuing to innovate across our businesses throughout the world. With our strong leadership team, we are committed to winning with our customers and delivering an outstanding team member experience.”  

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Jun 11, 2021

SokoFresh's cold storage units will stop food waste in Kenya

Food
foodtech
kenya
SokoFresh
Helen Adams
2 min
Many smallholder farmers in Kenya lack access to cold storage facilities. The new pay-as-you-go storage units from SokoFresh will decrease food waste

A foodtech company in Kenya is using solar energy to help smallholder farmers keep harvested produce cool to prevent food waste.

SokoFresh is a member of The Circulars Accelerator, an initiative to help entrepreneurs scale innovations that will help the world move towards a circular economy – in which waste is eliminated and resources are used again and again.

 

New cold storage units to prevent food waste

Small-volume farmers who grow avocados, mangos and French beans in Kenya, are helping to test the model from SokoFresh, which manages mobile cold storage units, that run on 100% solar energy.

By paying a small amount (1 Kenyan shilling) per kilogram on a pay-as-you-go basis, farmers or produce buyers can affordably access cold storage, when they need it.

SokoFresh plans for 400 cold storage units, in five years, to boost income for 35,000 farmers.

 

Cold storage units will support Kenya’s farmers 

About 90% of Kenya’s agricultural produce comes from smallholders, who don’t have the kind of cold storage solutions available to large-scale producers. This means lots of produce perishes in outside temperatures after being harvested.

“More than 30% of all food produced in the world for human consumption gets lost or wasted”, said a representative from SokoFresh says. “Food loss in Africa occurs almost entirely in the production and distribution stages.”

Farmers using the model can earn up to 50% more on their harvest, while buyers receive more and better quality produce.

The cost of logistics is also reduced, because trucks are picking up full loads that have been stored in the cold storage units by multiple farmers.

Enviu, the Netherlands-based impact venture organization behind SokoFresh, hopes to have a network of 400 cold storage units in the next five years. This would help 35,000 farmers, creating 3,000 new jobs in rural areas and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Sokofresh supports UN Sustainable Goal 12

Around 14% of food is lost after harvest on farms and at the transport, storage, processing and wholesale stages, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. This food has a value of more than $400b a year.

UN Secretary-General António Guterres last year described food loss and waste as an “ethical outrage.”

“In a world with enough food to feed all people, everywhere, 690 million people continue to go hungry and three billion cannot afford a healthy diet,” he said.

By 2030, UN member states have pledged to halve food waste and reduce food loss as part of Sustainable Development Goal 12.

SokoFresh is a part of the solution to food security and ending food waste.

 

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